Pupil Premium

Pupil Premium funding 2016-17

Summary of pupil premium grant

2016-17 student profile:

Year Group

Total number of students in year group

Number of students in receipt of pupil premium

Percentage of pupil premium students

Y7

229 86 38%

Y8

219 87 40%

Y9

221

72

33%

Y10

221

82

37%

Y11

211

65

31%

Y12

98

22

12%

Y13

80

Total 1101 (exc. Y12/ 414

38%

It is well known within the Thorne and Moorends communities that there are many parents who would be eligible for the pupil premium are not currently in receipt of this additional funding. For some families there is a stigma attached to claiming benefits of any kind and they will not register to enable us to claim the additional funding. In addition, Trinity Academy serves some areas of relatively high deprivation. This results in large numbers of “working poor” – those who remain a little over the threshold level to be able to claim free school meals.

Total pupil premium budget for 2016-17: £359,508

Pupil premium at Trinity Academy:

At Trinity Academy the quality of teaching on a day to day basis is the most important factor upon which we should focus. High quality interventions, though they may have a significant impact, are unable to compensate for weak teaching. Therefore, some of the resources that are provided through the pupil premium grant are used to improve the overall quality of teaching which will benefit all students.

All students progress is tracked and monitored carefully throughout their time in the academy. Data is provided for teaching staff to allow identification of those students within classes who are in receipt of pupil premium grants. Teachers planning is expected to take into account the needs of the students in each class. Teachers take responsibility for the students in their classes. Heads of Department, in turn, also have accountability for the progress and performance of individual students, but more so with the performance of groups of students. Directors, at a senior level, then have responsibility and accountability for the overall performance of students in receipt of the pupil premium within each key stage.

Drawing on a wide range of research and training, the academy adopts a range of strategies to ensure that disadvantaged students make progress. Funds are allocated for wave 2 (small group) and wave 3 (individual level) interventions. This is based on the evidence that such interventions will have a positive impact on student progress and attainment. The EEF Toolkit is used to inform such decisions.

The issues we face in working with disadvantaged students at Trinity Academy include:

  1. Attendance – there is a 3.5% gap in the 2015-16 academic year and this is an area for significant improvement and new strategies have been introduced
  1. Literacy weaknesses – either weak reading overall or poor comprehension skills. Data suggests that PP students are less likely to complete a book and quiz successfully (completing an online quiz to demonstrate their understanding and comprehension) using Accelerated Reader
  1. Weaker teaching – disadvantaged students are less tolerant of weaker teaching; strong teaching has a significantly greater impact for students with pupil premium funding and this remains a key focus
  1. Leadership weakness – poor accountability of staff leads to poor accountability of students with, for example, homework
  1. Discipline – poor student conduct by some students in some classes does not enable progress at the rate we desire – a clear outcome of the poor discipline of some students has been an increase in their exclusions and lost learning opportunities
  1. High achieving students with pupil premium funding are, as a group, not performing as well as they could

Trinity Academy will take a strategic and systematic approach to ensuring maximum impact of the pupil premium funding and, consequently, a reduction of gaps between the performance of disadvantaged students and all other students nationally. In time we will see the gap closing between our disadvantaged students and non-disadvantaged students nationally. Based on the evaluation of impact our allocation of funding is as follows.

Barriers to progress and allocation of funding:

 

Barrier to progress Allocation
Attendance: Ensuring the highest possible attendance for all students but with focus on reducing the gap between student groups; use of support staff to intervene with students whose attendance is poor to identify barriers; using Mike Liddle to visit and/or collect students on the second day of absence; paying for intervention of DMBC with home visits for students whose attendance is poor; Educational Welfare Officer and attendance officers targeting the attendance of disadvantaged students;

£30,000

Weaker teaching: use of additional coaching capacity of Steve Mulgrew to work with weaker teachers and Heads of Department to develop their leadership of teaching and learning; Mandy Smyth (assistant Vice Principal Teaching and Learning) providing coaching support to improve the quality of teaching; Chris Young working with Heads of Department to improve the quality of schemes of work and deployment of staff

£60,000

Reducing exclusions: use of Emmanuel House provision with students at risk of permanent exclusion or who are failing to engage with the provision within the academy

£100,000

Improving student conduct/behaviour: a team of Student Welfare Officers working within the pastoral team providing 1:1 and small group support for students; additional training and resourcing for Emotional Logic provision within the Academy; additional time has been given to Heads of Year and the Senior Tutors to be able to work with students (amounting to an additional 12 periods of teaching);

£90,000

Literacy improvement: use of Lexia to support weak reading; Accelerated Reader and coordinator role; appointment of senior leader to coordinate literacy and numeracy across the curriculum; appointment of literacy and numeracy coordinator;

£10,000

Hardship fund: small fund for students who need access to uniform assistance, trip subsidy or other such support

£5,000

Primary transition: use of Emmanuel House to work with students who are coming to the academy in need of additional support; summer school to ensure smooth transition of predominantly disadvantaged students

£18,000

Provision mapping: remaining funds available for more tailored support where needed for individual students;

£7,000

Easter and May half term revision schools: targeted revision support in preparation for the summer examinations

£10,000

Improving leadership: appointment of Directors to support the work of the Academic team; appointment of Literacy and Numeracy coordinator and Director to drive standards in reading, writing and numeracy across the curriculum; appointment of Senior Tutor (Student Welfare) to track and direct the work of the Student Welfare Officers; appointment of Senior Tutor (Student Conduct) to work with a team of Heads of Year to reduce instances of poor conduct in lessons; use of staff from across ESF to work with middle leaders to strengthen the quality of teaching;

£30,000

 

 

£360,000

Currently estimated


Pupil Premium funding 2015-16

For the academic year, 2015-16, the pupil premium grant Trinity Academy received was £351, 409. Details of how this was spent and the evaluation of these plans is reported below

Barriers to progress and allocation of funding:

Barrier to progress

Allocation

Attendance: Ensuring the highest possible attendance for all students but with focus on reducing the gap between student groups; Educational Welfare Officer and attendance officers targeting the attendance of disadvantaged students through, for example, first day calls to all PP students;

£60,000

Approx.

Weaker teaching: appointment of additional cover supervisors to ensure high quality teaching when teaching staff are absent; coaching of teaching staff; investment in TEEP further CPD

£70,000

Reducing exclusions: use of Emmanuel House provision with students at risk of permanent exclusion or who are failing to engage with the provision within the academy;

£20,000

Improving student conduct/behaviour: a team of Interventions Coordinators working within the pastoral team providing 1:1 and small group support for students, especially at Emmanuel House; additional training and resourcing for Emotional Logic provision within the Academy

£60,000

Literacy improvement: use of Lexia to support weak reading; Accelerated Reader and coordinator role;

£6000

Hardship fund: small fund for students who need access to uniform assistance, trip subsidy or other such support

£5000

Primary transition: use of Emmanuel House to work with students who are coming to the academy in need of additional support; summer school to ensure smooth transition of predominantly disadvantaged students; learning mentors spending time in primary schools to ensure that students transition well

£40,000

Easter and May half term revision schools: targeted revision support in preparation for the summer examinations

£10,000

Improving leadership: focusing on the academic and pastoral needs of PPG students with the appointment of KS3 and KS4 Academic Directors; KS3 and KS4 Pastoral Directors

£60,000

 

Provision mapping: remaining funds available for more tailored support where needed for individual students;

£10,000

Development fund: this fund was allowed for departments to bid for in support of student’s needs, in addition is was used for several whole cohort initiatives:

Maths interventions

PE interventions: rock climbing, archery

English interventions

Attendance prizes and incentives such as Prom attendance

£10,000

Initial analysis of progress of pupil premium students

  • Disadvantaged students made poor progress in relation to other students in some areas.
  • In some impact measures the gaps between students in receipt of the pupil premium and those who are not closed with some success:
  • In the EBCC subjects this gap was reduced by 6% though this is against a background of fewer students being eligible for this measure.
  • 4LOP in English was substantially better in measures for non-PP and PP students. Both were raised and improved with the PP students improving more than the non-PP students. This results in the gap reducing by 8%.
  • 3LOP in Mathematics was a slight improvement in the gap by almost 1%.
  • All Year 11 students went onto higher education, employment or training with no PPG students being NEET
  • Though there was not a reduction in the gap in every instance, there was an improvement in many measures for PP students from 2015 to 2016, some of those were significant improvements:
    • A*-C in English was almost 5% better
    • A*-C in Maths was 2.5% better
    • 3LOP in English was 12.1% better
    • 4LOP in Maths was 1.6% better
    • 4LOP in English was 17.2% better

These are positive indicators of improvement.